Thursday, February 22, 2007

New policies for suspended scaffolding

NYC mayor suggests new policies for suspended scaffolding

Lift Leader - Newsletter
February 2007
Complied By: Megan E. Baldwin, Editorial Assistant

In an effort to protect workers from falls from suspended scaffolds, New York City has announced plans to toughen-up on inspections and monitor the contractor safety practices. Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said the recommendations developed by a task force that included employers, will be enacted through new laws submitted to the City Council and through new city policies. Representatives of the U.S. Labor Dept. also worked with the city in developing the new measures. Because more than half of the suspended scaffold accidents in the city last year involved scaffolds hung from C-hooks, new laws will require the city be notified prior to their use or installation. Another measure submitted to the City Council would increase penalties for the violation of regulations governing licensed riggers, and a third bill would require daily written inspections by a trained site supervisor, rather than by the user of the suspended scaffold as currently required. "I know a lot of people will say, 'Oh, more regulation,' but there were 29 lives lost last year,“ Bloomberg said at a City Hall press conference. Over the next four years the City will invest $6 million dollars in implementing these recommendations, with $4 million dedicated to the creation of a new scaffold safety unit within the Department of Buildings.

Monday, February 12, 2007

Coroner calls for crane recall

Tuesday, 10 January 2006. 19:35 (AEDT)Tuesday, 10 January 2006. 18:35 (ACST)Tuesday, 10 January 2006. 18:35 (AEST)Tuesday, 10 January 2006. 19:35 (ACDT)Tuesday, 10 January 2006. 16:35 (AWST)

A Tasmanian coroner wants a type of crane recalled after a man was killed in a workplace accident at Margate more than two years ago.

Ian Matterson today released his findings into the death of 44-year-old Keith Mitchell in 2003.

Mr Mitchell and two others were working with crane hire company Elliott Brothers in September 2003.

They were moving a boat onto a trailer when the crane toppled.

The boom hit Mr Mitchell, killing him.

An inquest into Mr Mitchell's death heard that the Linmac crane had not been fitted with the necessary charts and instruments.

That prevented the rigger and crane operator from deciding how safe the lift was.

Mr Matterson said the lack of basic instruments was an issue that should have been addressed by Elliott Brothers.

Mr Matterson recommended that type of crane be recalled and fitted with the appropriate instruments.

He has also recommended Standards Australia be approached to ensure the equipment is mandatory.

Widow seeks damages after fatal crane accident

ABC News Online - Last Update: Thursday, January 12, 2006. 2:26pm (AEDT)

The widow of a man killed in a workplace accident in southern Tasmania more than two years ago is seeking more than $500,000 in damages from her husband's employer.

The coroner, Ian Matterson, criticised the crane hire company Elliott Brothers in his findings into the death of 44-year-old Keith Mitchell.

Mr Mitchell was an employee of Elliott Brothers in September 2003 when he and two others were working to transfer a boat from a Margate home to a trailer.

The crane toppled and Mr Mitchell was killed when he was struck by the boom.

Mr Matterson released his findings this week.

He found the crane did not have the necessary instruments, which would have enabled the crane's operator and rigger to determine how safe the lift was.

He said this matter should have been addressed by Elliott Brothers.

In a writ lodged in the Supreme Court in Hobart, Mr Mitchell's widow, Denise Linda Mitchell, is alleging the company was negligent.

She is seeking damages of nearly $530,000.

The court has not set a date to hear the matter.